How To Make Candles

Now, you too can learn how to make candles for fun, hobby or even create your own candle making business.

"I think this is an excellent book for all of you who want to learn how to make candles and considering a candle making business!

It was written by a friend of ours with years of experience in the business, and her way with words is down to earth and very enjoyable to read.

It's packed full of great advice and tips, it's easy to read and understand, and the layout is easy to follow. Click Here! if you want to get started in the candle making business.

History of Candles

History of candles tells us that early Americans made candles in the Autumn season. They would learn how to make candles out of necessity not just for fun. People spent hours boiling down the fat of newly slaughtered beef and sheep into tallow.

The job was hot and sweaty, and the odor of the rendering fat was also unpleasant and the product was far from perfect.

The candles burned too fast, buckled in warm weather, and gave off fumes and smoke.

Other sources of wax were favorable such as bayberry and beeswax. Both were expensive and candles made from them were reserved for special occasions.

It was not until the discovery of paraffin in the 1850's that the average family could enjoy the luxury of bright, steady, smokeless illumination.

How to make candles with Paraffin : The Basics

Ready to make Candles?

Candle making requires basic equipment that every household has. It is a simple job and easy to do. You will need an accurate candy thermometer so you can measure the temperature of the molten wax and lots of newspaper or paper towels in case you spill wax, which is hard to clean up.

If you are making dipped candles or molded candles, your first step is to melt the wax.

Wax is flammable, so don't try melting it in a container set directly over a flame.

As a saftey measure, use two pans. Have the first pan a wide bottomed pan, and fill it half full of water, and place it over a low flame.

Then put your second pan into the first pan and add several chunks of wax.

When the pieces of wax melt, add additional chunks of wax.

Safety Note: If the wax soes catch fire, have a lid that you can put over your pan to smother out the flame. Or you can pour baking soda over them, but baking soda will mess up your wax.

Wax floats on water, so don't try to put your flame out by using water.

Once the wax is melted, add three tablespoons ofstearin, pound and add coloring made special for candles.

The coloring can be in a liquid, solid, or powdered dye. Add a little at a time and test the color by dripping a bit on a white paper plate and allowing it to cool. Add more coloring if the color isn't what you wanted.

How to Make Candles With the Dipping Method

Learning how to make candles using the dipping method is fun and easy.

You need two cans for candle dipping.

One is for holding your molten wax, and the other is for holding your cool water.

The cans should be taller than the candles you are making. I use 48 oz. cans, but you can virtually pick any size just as long as the can is taller then the candles you plan to make. Keep the melted wax at 150 degrees Farenheit to 180 degrees F. during the dipping procedure.

Your "cooling water" should be about room temperature.

Cut your wicks 4 inches longer than the finished candles, and use a washer to tie to the lower end of each wick for so gravity will pull the wick down.

Take you wick and dip it individually or tie several to a dowel stick and dip them together.

After the first dip cools, pull the wicks straight.

It takes 30 to 40 dips to build your candle up to a one inch diameter.

For the last dipping add and extra tablespoon of stearin for each pound of wax. This will make the outer layer harder and the candle dripless.

When you have achieved the size of candle you want, cut the candle base straight with a sharp, heated knife, and trim the wick to 1/2 inch above your candle.

How to Make Candles With the Molding Method

Try to find some interesting shapes and molds when candlemaking.

Just about any can, jar, cup, paper towel rolls will do for making your molds. Be creative and find a unique mold. Milk cartons, jars, cans, plastic cups, cardboard rolls, and

For each mold you use, always coat the inside of your mold with a cooking oil or spray. This will help prevent your candle from sticking.

Sometimes a cardboard mold will lose it shape. So wrap it with string or duct tape to help hold the intentional shape you are looking for.

Next, prepare your container for the wick by using the wick in mold method.

Candlemaking wick in mold method: Cut your hole in the bottom center of your mold and tie a washer to wick bottom. Then, thread your wick through hole. Hold your wick end in place and the seal your hole with putty. Pull your wick taut at the top and tie the wick around a pencil that is resting on the top.

You can use a coffee can for melting your wax. Just bend the rim to make a spout.

For cardboard, plastic or glass molds, heat your wax to 130 degrees Farenheit.

for metal molds, heat the wax 190 degrees Farenheit.

Turn your flame off, and lift the can with potholders, and pour the wax into your molds.

Let the wax in your molds cool overnight, then place them in your refrigerator for 12 more hours.

You can peel off the cardboard or plastic molds from your candles. Therefore, you will need more molds for later candlemaking.

The good thing about glass and metal in your candlemaking process, is that you can reuse your molds. Just turn your glass or metal molds upside down and tap on the bottom until your candle slide out.

If your candle sticks, hold your mold briefly in hot water.

Smooth out the rough spots on your candles by rubbing them with a nylon stocking.

It is best practice to let your candles age for at least a week or even longer. Now that you have learned how to make candles, it may be time to take it to a whole new level.

"I think this is an excellent book for all of you who want to learn how to make candles and considering a candle making business!

It was written by a friend of ours with years of experience in the business, and her way with words is down to earth and very enjoyable to read.

It's packed full of great advice and tips, it's easy to read and understand, and the layout is easy to follow. Click Here! if you want to get started in the candle making business.

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